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of the working man's life. >> they seem to be doing that in some states. >> not allowing union bosses to compel them to write checks from their paychecks. where they don't belong. >> front page of all the papers. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my va
protecting nonunion workers from being forced to pay union dues. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm allison cam rat to in for megyn kelly today. the bill could be signed by the governor as early as tomorrow. pro-union protesters responding with shouts of "shame on you" from the gallery as huge crowds mass on the state capitol grounds. we understand police are ready with riot gear in case things turn ugly. thousands of union supporters have been at the statehouse since early today stomping their feet, chanting, as you can hear there, one union boss saying, quote: we're going to take you on and take you out. nearby an angry confrontation breaking out. union protesters apparently storming the tent of the local chapter of conservative group americans for prosperity, tearing it down and then going after some right-to of work supporters -- right-to-work supporters. let's watch this. in -- >> shut your mouth! shut your mouth, i wasn't talking to you! you put your hands on me, see what happens. shut up! shut your mouth. [bleep] >> hey, hey! >>> lien -- [bleep] >> you guys are knocking the
the rights of unions. in fact, it was exactly that kind of scene michigan governor rick snyder, a republican, had said he wanted to avoid. in february, governor snyder looked at those other midwestern states with republican governors and workers protesting in the state capital and decided he did not want that thing in michigan, not in his historically very strong union state. governor snyder said, "you look at now that they've had those things happen, do they have a productive environment to solve problems? not necessarily. they're still overcoming the divisiveness, the hard feelings from all of that." at the time reporters wanted to know whether rick snyder would support what is known as a right to work law. the idea of right to work is simple. under a right to work law, employees of a union shop don't have to pay union dues. the employees get the benefit of the union, the higher wages and better health care, all of that, but they do not have to pay for it. why pay money if you can have something for free? for unions, the results of this are close to catastrophic which is why republicans an
swarched the state capital. union supporters are rallying around the capital building itself in lansing as gop lawmakers from both state houses vote on a bill that would significantly weaken union rights in a state considered one of the cradles of the labor movement. the law prohibits workers from being required to pay union dues as a condition of employment. republican governor schneider saying that he'll sign that bill right away making michigan the 24th state with the right to work. >>> yesterday president obama joined the chorus of voices condemning this move. >> by the way, what we shouldn't do, i just got to say this, what we shouldn't be doing is taking away your right to bargain for better wages. giving you the right to work for less money. >> nbc is live from lansing, michigan, and from detroit i'm joined by michigan democratic congressman gary peters. ron, i'm going to start with you. describe the scene for us there and what's at stake. >> reporter: good day to you. it just started snowing within the past few minutes. these folks are braving very cold temperatures here but the
were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be focused on. host: distorts free press, courtesy of the newseum in washington, as this headline -- some schools are closed in the state so teachers can also protests that block today. here is the detroit news. there headline -- michigan pro-union people are protesting this law. the republican-led legislature is expected to take it up today. this legislation would bar workers from being required to pay union fees as a condition of employment even as thousands of union members plan to protest at the state capital. the story continues inside the new york times. we are getting your take on this this morning. start dialing in now. the wall street journal editorial page, they weigh in on the issue this morning. you ca
capital yesterday, and it's not over. why are these unions so angry about giving workers free choice? why is so much of the news media carrying the union's water by not reporting the story? we'll have some answers in just a little while. now, the market gyrated today over ben bernanke and the fed. at first they loved the new bond buying and money printing message. but then they gave up all their gains feeling unemployment may drop faster and the party would somehow be over. i'm not sure i understand this but we'll ask our experts mike, i gue i guess the idea is maybe the unemployment gets to 6.5% and the 0 interest rate goes up, why would that be bad? sometimes i don't understand the stock market at all. >> i don't think it's the employment figure. i think it's the inflation number that bernanke threw out there, larry. you also mentioned 2.5% inflation as being certainly that would look him put the brakes on. we look at treasuries relative to tips, it's a at 3.08%. i think the market is saying we might be where bernanke is talking about inflation and putting on the brakes. i think that's
day, one day, right to work, destroying labor unions. labor unions have vowed to fight back. the republican war on labor unions goes on and on in the state of michigan, from wisconsin to ohio and now to michigan we've got to fight back and we will. plus all of the news of the day. but first, we get the latest. start off with today's current news update from lease a ferguson standing buy out in los angeles. hi, lease a. good morning. >> hey, bill. good morning, everyone. as bill mentioned, president obama is taking his fiscal cliff campaign back on the road again today. he is headed today redford, michigan where he will tour a diesel plant and speak to middle class workers. he will push his plan to raise encloses above 250 -- to raise taxes above $250,000 a year. president obama met with house speaker boehner for the first time in more than three weeks. the house is still refuseing to pass obama's tax plan much less agree to other policies. josh earnest is not giving any details into yesterday's. some republicans are coming around on improving
. >> including the shooter who turned the gun on himself. >>> a legal landmark in michigan. once a union strong hold, the new measure that is dealing a serious blow to organized labor. >>> then call it the safety dance. the cop who is really busting a move or two. >> he's having fun on his job. i can appreciate that. >> getting low, getting low, getting low. i wonder if he has a sound track out there for him. or just his own tunes going on in his head. >>> but first, the white house is out with a strong reaction to north korea's successful test firing of a long-range ballistic missile. >> the obama administration calls the launch a highly provocative act that threatens regional security. the question now, does the threat extend to this country? >> reporter: in a breaking news broadcast, north korean television celebrated the regime's successful test of the long-range rocket from its launch site. it is the second attempt by the north koreans this year. last april, a similar test failed within minutes after takeoff. this time, the rocket traveled directly over okinawa, before falling 180 miles no
the fate of unions forever. we'll explain. >> alisyn: plus, you know it takes a lot to get me to the gym so there must be something exciting happening at this gym. >> clayton: was hugh jackman there? >> it's called workout glam. those two words. ♪ she's a bad of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. like say, gas station sushi. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-
union and worked at the fairmont hotel, and also at the st. francis hotel and ended her career at the bakery. she is preceded in death by her husband who served three years in the coast guard and 30 in the navy. fay will be missed by her two sisters in michigan plus many her neez live niece lives in -- memorial services were held on november 17. ms. bingham will be greatly missed. thank you to debby, from human services network for alerting us to the passing of ms. bingham. also i have a couple of other wanted to say that coming up on the imperative agenda is a resolution in support of small business saturday which is the saturday two days after thanksgiving. and the resolution -- the imperative agenda resolution declares november 24, 2012 the citizen after thanksgiving holiday as small business holiday to celebrate increasing awareness of locally owned small business in san francisco. small businesses have less than 100 employees represent 98% of employ approximately 50% of employees in the private sector. small businesses also contribute to 52% of the total sales of taxes pai
to push through this right to work. >> this is interesting actually. michigan is a heavily unionized state so why would it be going right to work. there's enormous downward pressure on wages on american companies around the world that can make things cheaper elsewhere than here and our wages are uncompetitive in a lot of ways. in effect what people in michigan have to decide, do you want fewer jobs at higher wages or lower jomore jobs at lower w they have decided they want more jobs. >> you look at michigan and detroit, that's a pretty easy answer. >> the unemployment rate. >> the unemployment rate is horrible. detroit in 1960, i think, was one of the wealth nest city if not the wealthiest city in america and now one of the poorest. >> the fourth largest. >> this is a done deal, going through the house today, to a republican governor and says he will sign it. >> it's symbolic of two things, one, the politics of it all, what we've seen in wisconsin and elsewhere and the unpopularity of unions these days and secondly an economic phenomenon, basically a statement we want jobs and we're willin
process, play? as the soviet union teetered toward an end to? >> i am not sure it had that much direct effect. i would say that ending the arms race, because this was the beginning of ending the arms race and you know it really took the s.t.a.r.t. treaty and a series of others to do so, and it took the liberation of eastern europe and, which went as a separate process. but, i would say that these things actually freed up gorbachev to try to reform the system. it took the pressure off of him. as long as we had the arms race, they had an excuse not for changing the system, but once you and the cold war, not just the arms race, and gorbachev ended it ideologically december 7, 1988, today is also an anniversary of that -- exactly a year after he signed the inf treaty, what he ended in that speech aside from announcing unilateral reductions in their military, was he discarded the class struggle as the rationale for soviet foreign-policy. that was the rationale that also cut the khan eunice party as the dictatorship in the country. so the end of the cold war reforms that gorbachev started th
that 25% of republicans want their state to secede from the union. do you believe this number? i am deeply convinced it's mainly in the south. and by the way, another 19% say they aren't so sure about secession. are these people meatheads or what? 44% of the republican party either does or might go along with ses secession. what do you want to bet these are the same people who say president obama is a muslim. just guessing. >>> he's outspoken, tough, irreverent, biting, funny, and very, very smart. he'll be insufferable now. barney frank entered congress at the start of the reagan revolution. he's leaving it as it begins to crumble, some say. the man from massachusetts joins us tonight. >>> finally, consider yourself warned, barack obama is a socialist leading the country to communism. that's the latest from the sage of wasilla, sarah palin. that's what she's still saying. and this is "hardball," the place for politics. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on w
their constitutions to bar gay unions. here with us to explain today's development, and where it could lead, is marcia coyle of "the national law journal." welcome back, marcia. >> thanks, marg wet. >> warner: so is it fair to say first of all that the court's decision to hear these first two cases in itself a momentous decision? >> absolutely. a number of gay rights organizations, particularly as if relates to the federal defense of marriage act have been working towards that point. and yes, whatever the court says, if it reaches the merits of these cases will be extremely important. >> warner: let's take them one by one, prop 8 in california first. remind us briefly of how what started out as a state issue ended am in the supreme court. >> the california supreme court a number of year its ago ruled that same sex marriages were constitutional under its state constitution. voters disagreed by passing proposition 8 in 2008 banning those marriages. proposition 8 was challenged by gay and lesbian couples who were represented by former opponents ted olson and david buoyes. it ultimately reached the federa
being organized by eco was, the economic community of west african states, and the african union. in the weeks ahead, the u.n. security council will likely vote on a resolution authorizing this coalition to lead a military intervention to dislodge the terrorists in the northern. we've seen models like this wo work, in cote d'ivoire and somalia, so there's reason to believe in the potential of a regional military solution to the security crisis in the north. however, even if this intervention works, it will take time to train and equip and assemble the regional force and to develop the appropriate plans for what happens during and after a military intervention. and, frankly, mr. president, security and stability can't be restored to mali with military action alone. the current crisis is as much about governance as it is about security. a stronger m stronger malian des the best way to ensure short gains in the short-term and long-term. but democracy doesn't just begin and end with an election. one of the reasons that mali democracy crumbled so quickly is that malians did not feel c
faced down the soviet union and had 500,000 combat troops in the field? the sequester isn't stepping off a cliff. it is taking one step back from the cliff. now, the tax increases, however, are a very different matter. without intervention, the federal tax burden will balloon 1% at the stroke of -- 21% at the stroke of midnight on new year's eve, taking $2,000 to $3,000 from an averaged family. the house passed legislation to protect our nation from such a calamity but mr. obama vowed to veto it and the senate killed it. . instead mr. he obama tells us he'll veto any plan that stops taxes going up on all those very wealthy folks making over $200,000, who he says need to pay their fair share. i suppose fairness is in the eyes of the beholder. the top 1% earned 17% of all income but pays 37% of all income taxes. but that's beside the point. the fine point of it is that a lot of these very wealthy folks making over $200,000 aren't very wealthy, and they aren't even folks. they are 1.3 million struggling small businesses filing under subchapter s. our small businesses produce 2/3 of the new
prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries that our welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employer's. -- employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unemployment is probably a good thing, but when you expanded too far, it put a really heavy burden on the employers. as one lady called in on the last segment, the state she was from is obviously much higher than made is, but when it gets to a point that your state system goes broke, they put fees on the employer, and they can
and incredibly radical document and there's a plebiscite in pennsylvania. the unionization in a sense of the militias is what gets a yes vote in some ways and then the constitution basically they say you know how we were talking about being radical place in the declaration? we will back that down a bit. the constitution is a different revolution and things go back and forth from there. >> we should open the floor to questions and you have written seven books. i have always found one of the most disappointing moments in my life is when i finished writing a book and i had to start over again and sometimes i don't have an idea of. what is the next bob sullivan book? 's we will be here for the next book reading. and i mean it. i'm a tremendous admirer and i think everyone of your books is a revelation. e.u. are so entertaining and learning at the same time in your extraordinary. >> i just read his books, i'm not kidding. i am trying to write a book and it's so depressing. it's so depressing. i can't begin to tell you. i'm trying to write a book and for 23 years i've been trying not to wri
parents in utah or any other state in our great union. article for this treaty obligates the united states to recognize economic, social and cultural entitlements is rights under domestic u.s. law. the senate is my opinion has not adequately investigated how the standard will affect domestic u.s. federal and state law. we have had one hearing on this issue that included both opponents and opponents of the treaty but did not substantively address my concerns about the standard, about the significant addition to what would become the law of the land of the united states of america. for these and other reasons, mr. president, he must oppose the u.n. convention on the rights of disabilities and encourage my colleagues to do the same. thank you mr. president. >> senator from massachusetts. >> i listen carefully to the senator and i understand colleagues on the other side of the aisle have concerns about the united nations and i respect that. we've had the space before, but i'm having difficulty finding where the threat gains any reality the senator has described specifically with respect to chi
union, y wolfer in the mid-1980's. that evolved into pride at work, an lgbt labor associated affiliated with afl-cio and howard served as vice president until before his death. howard is preceded in death by his parents and his older brother john of denver. he is survived by his sister barbara, nieces linda, gwen, the social movements that he led and those that continue to howard was that unique individual that remained true to his beliefs throughout his life. and i think that those of us who know him can fairly say that he certainly made the world ah nj better place, and the world was extremely lucky that he was a part of it. and for those of us who had the opportunity to have him in our lives, we are eternally grateful. there will be(n% ]$÷ a memorian january 6 at iowu local 34 next to the giants ballpark from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. and we will have figures like dolores huerta and others who will be there to honor howard's life. its is with great sadness we announce his passing and respectfully ask that we adjourn today's meeting in howard wallace's memory. thank you, howard. may you re
of a bombing suspect who damaged the atm outside the virginia credit union. someone put an explosive device at the base of the atm near the drive-in window. the bank and six apartments nearby were temporarily evacuated. police hope the images will lead to an arrest. >>> a gaithersburg family fears wild animals are responsible for a deadly attack on their farm. coyotes or possibly wild dogs wandered on their property in woodfield road and killed several sheep. the family is worried the animals could strike again. the attacks don't just put the sheep in danger, but kids as well. >> we have so many kids in the surrounding area, and they all play outside. these dogs, whatever they are, are out there, and it's just a matter of time before they attack a person walking or children. >> this was the second attack like this one in two weeks. the family believes the sheep are easy prey and could be attacked again. >>> ten minutes now until 6:00. three weeks from now you'll be able to gather in maryland at this time. maryland casinos will be allowed to stay open 24 hours a day starting on december 27th
union, the mood is once again sour on both sides. >> there has been a development. it is not a positive one. we were advised in a voicemail message that the moves the players made were unacceptable. >> i am disappointed beyond belief that we are where we are tonight, and we're going to have to take a deep breath and try and regroup. >> the owners rejected an eight-year collective bargaining agreement. no new talks are scheduled just yet. >>> one prince george's county teen may not have gotten a whole lot of sleep last night. sheould make history tonight on the basketball court. jasmine hill of surratsville high school will look to become the first female in that school's history to score 1,000 points. right now she has 996 points heading into tonight's game against gwen park. hill will continue her hoops career next year at howard university. way to go. congrats. >>> the national christmas tree is shining bright this morning after a star studded lighting ceremony. >> three. two. one. ♪ >> 17,000 people gathered on the south lawn of the white house last night to watch the first family
out the rise of the soviet union and its intentions. president truman, my fellow missourian, and his staff glued together the containment strategy which stayed in effect through admiral -- excuse me, through general eisenhower's presidency and later until, as you know, the wall in berlin came tumbling down, and the soviet union imploded on itself. the strategy worked. after we get this solved, it's important that we glue together a national strategy. it's going to be different. there's not one single threat out there, but many. terrorism, force upon force, state against state challenges, and that's what we must do. and we must nurture those in the war colleges and in the state department who have that strategic vision, that ability to glue together a good strategy and make sure that it does come to pass. so i'm hopeful we can solve the problem, that the congress can come together as we did for many, many years in tough, tough, difficult choices. and if you watch the comedians from time to time, you will see larry the cable guy. and let me take a frame -- a phrase from him to the cong
are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 485, h.r. 6190, a bill to direct the administer of the environmental protection agency to allow for the distribution, sell and consumption in the united states of remaining inventories of the over-the-counter c.f.c. epinephrine inhalers. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 229. the nays are 182. 2/3 not being in the affirmative, the rules are not suspended and the bill is not passed. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leaves of absence for mr. griffin of arkansas for
, union rights? >> i don't think him as a policy nerd and i don't think he was a policy leader. i do think to give him his due analytically, he was politically important, and did he something that both parties need because of gerrymandering and because of the partisanship in the system, he helped drive competitive primaries. at this point in our history we have high participation but low democracy because we have such undemocratic and uncompetitive general elections, and we have a lot of other problems in the system. he's a part of most of those problems. he infamously promised to put a hold, that is to threaten to filibuster, every piece of legislation in the senate which goes back to the problem of him not being a serious or a leader in that pbody. but the good part of the tea party, whatever you think of their values, was that we had more competitive races than usual, and in some cases we had ideas tested and exposed and i think that's good for the process. in that regard i give him more credit than other establishment lead whose would never allow democracy in a primary. >> would you gi
to celebrate the union of tim and laura. it's amazing how appreciative people are when you tell them they could save a lot of money on their car insurance by switching to geico...they may even make you their best man. may i have the rings please? ah, helzberg diamonds. nice choice, mate. ...and now in the presence of these guests we join this loving couple. oh dear... geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. >>> the speaker john boehner offers a new plan to cut spending by demanding that president obama come up with john boehner's plan to cut spending. what those cuts are, no one is sure. >> now critics say the speaker is just asking democrats to put specifics into the republican proposal, but i say that's kind of fun. it makes the budget into a giant mad lib. for instance, we agree to cut $10 bazillion from the program that brings ukuleles to the sticky poor. toilet boobs. >> we will play our very own game of mad libs when house democratic whip steny hoyer joins us live just ahead on "now." to the best vacation spot on earth. (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our
that is playing out across the global shipping industry as ports and their unionized work forces gird for an era of briskly expanding foreign trade. the strike that shut down the ports of los angeles and long beach paralleled the generational skirmishes that have ripped through factory shops. cargo companies and ports want to cut costs and automate operations to compete with aggressive rivals in canada and south america. that is pitting them against unions, which are struggling to reserve high-paying jobs for the middle-class members. it was resolved late tuesday, according to this article. here is the front page of the press." feet frefree state says detroit out of time to fix its fiscal mess. falling revenues and rising expenses. the state of michigan delivered an abrupt ultimatum to the city wednesday. move quickly toward reform, or an emergency financial manager will be reported. -- a ppointed. -- appointed. dana in california, republican. caller: i'm 56 years old. i live in california. i can give the perspective of what has happened in my state and the economy and all that stuff. back in 19
privacy notices explaining information sharing practices to customers. banks and credit unions are required to give these notices even if their privacy notices have not changed. this creates not only waste for financial institutions but confusion among and increased cost to consumers. in his book entitled "the financial crisis and free market cure,"ellis reports that one bank offered at the end of its privacy notice to pay $100 to any customer that read the privacy notice in full. year after -- only one person kid. let's think about this cost for a second. this outdated requirement doesn't cost only in postage alone but also costs in compliance costs, cost of supplies, printing fees and man hours. i talked to one community bank in my district that said they spent roughly 70 cents per disclosure. with a minimum of 250,000 accounts and customers this bank spends $175 a year on this requirement. it may not seem like a lot of money to some of my colleagues but i can tell you $175,000 is a lot of money to small institutions like the one in my district especially when these costs are
when they did everything they could to prevent the middle class from being created by unions. host: take us one month into the future and what you think will happen until the next couple of weeks? caller: i have no idea. i hope that obama sticks to his principles. i think they should leave medicaid, medicare, and social security alone. we have a very bulleted defense budget that needs to be cut. eisenhower warned us a denture his final address that the military-industrial complex would destroy this country. that is where the cuts should come from. host: thank you for the call. a few programming notes for you today. james taylor will be at the national press club at 1:00. the singer-songwriter and guitarist will be talking about election reform at the national press club. you can catch that live on c- span and c-span radio. also, live at 7:00 p.m. at the university of virginia, mark warner sponsoring legislation to allow highly skilled immigrants into the united states. he will discuss his proposal at a forum hosted by the university of virginia at 7:00 p.m. right here on c-span. we
-second interpretation is this. this radical document, the kind of unionization of the sense of malicious, in some ways, and then constitution. basically they say do you know how we were talking about the radical place, well, let's just cut that down a bit. the constitution is a different revolution. then things go back and forth from there. >> i think we should open the floor to questions, but they're still nearly 27 books. >> twenty-five. >> i've always found when the most disappointing moment in my life is when i finished writing a book and then i have to start all over again. let's all fix are counted so we will be here for the next the book reading. and i mean that. i have a tremendous admirer. i think everyone of your book -- books is -- you are learning at the same time. yourself extraordinary. >> so, i have tried to write a book. [inaudible] i'm trying to write a book about a guy i tried not -- for about 23 years tried not to write about them. seems kind of silly, but he is a photographer. [inaudible] >> i just realized, born in the fanny switches to see all that death. then he comes and he goe
. it is the legal, romantic, hopefully sexual union of two individuals, period, the end. they get to write their own ticket and vows. they can, you know, assume in their relationship and marriage, all the things they expect a marriage to be. they can be very different. marriage is very subjective and interesting and new. redefined by straight people. >> do you think that our political culture and social life and media have -- in the same way we have moved toward enlightment, it strikes me when we have moments like petraeus, that there seems no movement in certain ways about the way we think about sex in public life, particularly in those moments when you have sex scandals. >> i wish we would get more french more fast. the appalling thing is the fbi without warrants digging through e-mails. >> let me stop you there. there is a sense that if you were in a monogamous relationship and there's an understanding, it's a bad thing to do. >> it is a bad thing to do, but a common thing. if the fbi can kick in your front door if you do that, a lot of people should be nervous. 40% of women and 60% of men have c
our union, the importance of this law cannot be overstated. that's why the voting rights act enjoys a broad spectrum of support. in 2006, the senate voted unanimously 98-0 to reauthorize it, and just this year, the department of justice used its authority under section 5 of the voting rights act to object to new voter identification laws that threaten to disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of voters. in texas, according to the state's own data, more than 79 5,000 registered voters didn't have the i.d. required under their brand-new law. in south carolina, the states data kateed 240,000 registered voters were without the required i.d. and wouldn't be able to vote under the states law. in to states alone over a million people were going to be denied the right to vote even though they were registered voters because they didn't possess the newly defined voter i.d. in each of those states. that's more than one million registered voters -- i repeat -- that would have been turned away. thanks to the justice department and court decisions, that didn't happen. but it would have. that was th
. the european union has received the nobel peace prize. this fall's the devastation of world war ii. the council president and president of the parliament all collected the diplomas and metals any ceremony in oslo. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> i think that people still love discovery. i don't mean just the channel. i mean the ability to find surprises. every month or every year, i giggle a little bit about some show that people are suddenly talking about that i don't think you could ever have imagined choosing. if you came to me and said -- mike, i want you to choose "honey boo boo," or the show with the duck guy, or a certain food channel network, i do not think that if i had to predetermine that as a preference, i would have ever picked them. but the ability to stumble on them, or to hear people talk about them, going into an environment like that and dabble around and suddenly find, you know what, i kind of like "honey boo boo," and i'm watching it. i think that's a huge part of the american television experience and i think it gets sold short by tal
resolutions. there are going to have to be consequences. the european union is also going to get involved and more sanctions. but my point is, i don't think they still have the capability to reach the united states, but they might some time soon. and so what we have to do is recognize that possibility. so a new approach, i believe, is needed. and i have i haven't figured out what that might be. we've tried engagement, diplomacy, excessive sanctions, isolate. i still think the worst thing to do is try to isolate them, sanction them to death. they already have so many sanctions. perhaps some new framework involving a different kind of six-party talks. the view has been that china runs the show with north korea. well, that's obviously not the case. they've got leverage, but, i think some new thinking is really needed. >> because i've heard, and i'm sure you have as well, from some optimists out there, because he has now proven himself to the generals and others, kim jong-un, the new leader of north korea, approaching the one-year anniversary of his father's death, he's got credibility, and p
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